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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa

Valentin von Massow

Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa

problems, policies, and prospects

by Valentin von Massow

  • 354 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by International Livestock Centre for Africa in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan,
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan.
    • Subjects:
    • Dairy products -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
    • Dairy products industry -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
    • Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Economic policy.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementValetin H. von Massow.
      SeriesILCA research report ;, no. 17
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD9275.A6 M375 1989
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvi, 46 p. :
      Number of Pages46
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1848327M
      ISBN 109290530987
      LC Control Number89981337
      OCLC/WorldCa21159153

        Reviewing the ten most relevant dairy markets in Sub-Saharan Africa highlights the significant differences between them. In West Africa, for example, barriers to entry are generally lower and market access is easier, generating interest among importers as an early entry point. Africa remains a continent largely dependent on imports for its basic food needs. This has included food such as dairy, meat, sugar and cereal, indicating how essential food imports are for the continent. While import dependency varies by country, Africa’s high food import bill remains a challenge to the various African nations to develop waysFile Size: KB.

      Denmark-based dairy firm Arla has announced its plan to increase its business in sub-Saharan Africa over the next two years: Arla would also partner with South Africa-based NGO Action Aid to promote economic development in Africa. pattern emerges as Sub -Saharan Africa is the only developing-country region that has seen its share of world agricultural imports increase rather than decrease (Baccetta, ; WB, ; and Christiansen, ). The cause of poor export performance in agricultural sector in SSA has been attributed to poor domestic.

      Unfortunately, in many parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, milk production is highly dependent on rain-grown fodder (grass). As a result, the market experiences sharp fluctuations in milk production and supply throughout the year. Surplus milk is often produced during the rainy season while in the dry seasons, milk production can be very low. A rising middle class, expanding population and stagnant local agricultural production are driving up Africa’s food imports. Bad luck is partly to blame. Weather-related damage has hit rice.


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Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa by Valentin von Massow Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa: Problems, policies and prospects Valentin H. von Massow ILCA Research Report No. 17 International Livestock Centre for Africa.

In addition, imports by Sub-Saharan Africa were $16 billion more than India, a country with a much larger population. At nearly $6 billion, wheat was a major contributor to Sub-Saharan Africa’s record agricultural imports in Wheat was. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Massow, Valentin von, Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa.

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: International Livestock Centre for Africa, []. The issue of dairy in Africa involves a plethora of factors that cannot be completely synthesized into one story line. For example, capacity is a mixed bag of facts. According to a recent survey by East Africa Dairy Development (EADD), there is a surplus of 52 million liters of milk in Rwanda, which experts forecast to increase over time.

Merchandise Trade summary statistics data for Sub-Saharan Africa (SSF) including exports and imports, applied tariffs, top export and import by partner countries and top exported/imported product groups, along with development indicators from WDI such as GDP, GNI per capita, trade balance and trade as percentage of GDP for year.

“I have had my mother's wing of my genetic ancestry analyzed by the National Geographic tracing service and there it all is: the arrow moving northward from the Dairy imports into sub-Saharan Africa book savannah, skirting the Mediterranean by way of the Levant, and passing through Eastern and Central Europe before crossing to the British Isles.

And all of this knowable by an analysis of the cells on the inside of. Exports and imports of products by stages of processing in are below along with their corresponding Product Share as percent of total export or import.

Sub-Saharan Africa Raw materials exports are worth US$million, product share of %.; Sub-Saharan Africa Raw materials imports are worth US$ 32, million, product share of %.; Sub-Saharan.

volume of dairy imports more than doubled during the s and reached US$ million inbut they have since fallen (to US$ million in ) under the influence of higher world prices and more realistic exchange rates. This study shows that more than half the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa -- with aboutFile Size: 8MB.

Abstract. Although agriculture dominates the economies of most of the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa the rapidly rising rate of import of food and agricultural products over the last two decades has given considerable cause for concern (World Bank, ; Paulino and Cited by: 3.

Dairy development in sub-Saharan Africa: a study of issues and options (English) Abstract. Rapid population growth and urbanization is creating a strong demand for milk in sub - Saharan Africa (SSA) and the majority of countries have the potential to meet the growing demand by developing their domestic by: An overview of dairying in sub-Saharan Africa A.J.

Nell Dairy marketing and development in Africa Kenneth Shapiro, Edward Jesse and Jeremy Foltz Dairy imports in sub-Saharan Africa Shahla Shapouri and Stacey Rosen Dairy imports and their influence on domestic dairy marketing, with particular reference to Tanzania L.L.M.

Ngigwana. While welcoming the delegation during a tour of one of Arla’s dairy farms, Steen Hadsbjerg, senior vice president and head of Arla Foods for Sub-Saharan Africa, said Nigeria is key to Arla’s. The dairy industries of most African countries are in the doldrums, with high operating costs that make their products less competitive than imports.

South Africa is currently the only significant. Dairy Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Study of Issues and Options (World Bank Technical Paper) by Michael J.

Walshe (Contributor) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. India, for sub-Saharan Africa, current agricultural productivity is low and there have been numerous failures in getting agriculture moving.

Over the past 10 years, Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has experienced encouraging economic growth averaging about per cent with some non-oil-exporting countries reaching an average of more than eight per cent.

The Outlook foresees a further increase of food imports into sub-Saharan Africa, because demand for food is expected to grow at more than 3 percent over. The largest growth potential for African wheat imports lies hidden in western and eastern regions of sub-Saharan Africa – and less with.

Population growth, urbanisation and increased per capita milk consumption are main reasons for recent increasing milk demand in Africa. Due to globalisation, it is important to know how competitive various production systems are, especially as most governments promote local production and disfavour dairy imports.

The TIPI-CAL (Technology Impact, Policy Impact Cited by: Sub-Saharan Africa has a wide variety of climate zones or biomes. South Africa and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in particular are considered Megadiverse has a dry winter season and a wet summer season. The Sahel extends across all of Africa at a latitude of about 10° to 15° N.

Countries that include parts of the Sahara Desert proper in their northern. considerable amounts of milk today and also account for above 90% of dairy ruminant population in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Indigenous groups like the Maasai, Borani, Fulani and Tuareg have a strong historic dairy tradition. They share many customs and regard milk as a product of harmony that is offered free to relatives, friends and Size: KB.

export-based manufacturing in Africa and which countries are well placed to make use of the opportunities (we are focusing on policy analysis). Section 7 concludes.

1 We use the term Africa to mean Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) (which includes South Africa). The paper focuses specifically on the following nine. Vera Songwe and Deborah Winkler examine the effects of exports and export diversification on growth and the policy implications for post-crisis export strategies in .Prospects for Uganda's Dairy Industry.

Experience in sub-Saharan Africa shows that the. on imports of dairy products will (be reduced) from.